Caddis larvae mop variants
Tied by: Bill Trublubug Southeastern PA, US
Bill Trublubug

Bill Trublubug
9 months ago

Still playing around. Though the mop variants might make decent caddis larva if I downsized.

It’s still raining cats and dogs here, so I’m still playing around.

Next permutation on these might be the use of a color of pearl ice dub brushed out and pulled back along the body to simulate the gas bubbles in an almost ready to pupate larvae.

I need the rain to stop I think ?

Jason Michael
9 months ago

What kind of chinelle is used on this pattern bill?

Bill Trublubug
9 months ago

@1119856188131766 Jason, it’s ultra chenille size medium. I think I got it from Orvis.

Jon Redwine
9 months ago

Bill, I really like these. I tied something similar a while back, but haven’t gotten around to using it. How do you do on them in your waters. From past discussions our waters seem similar.

Bill Trublubug
9 months ago

They work pretty well here Jon. Size seems to often be the key to success. I tie several variations that all look pretty much the same. While this one pictured is done with a medium chenille, I often use the micro size on a 16-18. I’d break out your versions and give them a swim. The olive is the favored color in fall, the brighter green is better in spring. I’ve not experimented too much with the dubbing colors at the head. Black or peacock dub work for me. I still want to try the ice dub notion. Leaving the fibers long and pulled back along the body could make a fly that might be similar in appearance to a Fontaine Sparkle Pupa.

Bill Trublubug
9 months ago

@jredwine Hi Jon, Just wondering how fancy/complicated your versions are? I put this fly in the Kamikaze class because it’s so simple and I can fish it in those spots where it can get hung up easily. I’ve experimented a bit with rhyacophilia larva imitations and don’t find that those perfect imitations with body segments, gills, legs etc, catch me more trout than these simple ones. Any similar experiences?

Jon Redwine
9 months ago

Yes definitely similar experiences. I’ve tied the larva (ususally the brachycentrus larva) trying to make every segment perfect etc. then tie something like this and find it fishes better anyway. I like quick and simple, but I look for quick, simple and effective. If I lose a few I don’t feel bad and you’re right I tend to fish them in heavy cover because of that. Then I catch more fish because I’m fishing them where trout live instead of worrying about losing the fly. The moral of the story is this: it’s probably not more effective than the more complicated patterns, I just fish it where the fish in heavy cover are sitting because if I lose the fly, I know how easy it is to replace.

Bill Trublubug
9 months ago

@jredwine Thanks for sharing your similar experiences Jon. Our waters “may” indeed be similar but our thoughts on tying and fishing are even better matches. I do believe in quick and simple idea and losing these types of patterns is ok with me. That’s why I so often refer to them as kamikaze patterns. I also think that we catch more fish with our “go to” patterns just because their use brings a confidence to our fishing. We “know” that the trout will take and so everything we do from false cast to making that dragless perfect drift gets better. My waters are heavily pressured and the trout learn quickly where to hide. I’ve discovered I enjoy making that nearly impossible cast into tight spots more than standing patiently and casting again and again to a fish that might “finally” take. Again, thanks for your thoughts. I’m always trying to learn something new or confirm something I’ve already seen.

Bill Trublubug
9 months ago

You’ve raised another question in my mind with your comments on the brachycentrus larva. I’ve not fished a case-less brachy imitation. Do you find a large number of these without the usually squared off cases that make them so easy to identify? I’ve experienced a number of events where a certain species of fly will do a simultaneous molt (stoneflies) and also captured tons of a single species in my collection nets as the insects go through that “invertebrate drift” thing. I hate to be missing out on something by not fishing case-less brachy imitations. Thanks.

Jon Redwine
9 months ago

I rarely see them outside the case. However, I’ve found that trout will readily eat them in that brilliant green color. I used to try to tie the cased caddis because I know trout will eat the case and all. Once I realized the case isn’t important I then realized I could save about 10 minutes of unnecessary tying per fly. Not sure if your more pressured fish will behave the same way, maybe not, but we don’t have heavy pressure up here. Fly fishermen (trout guys in general) are somewhat rare. This is big musky and walleye country so there are way more guys out doing that than there are guys out pressuring our trout streams. Lucky me I guess! Lol!

Bill Trublubug
9 months ago

Thanks Jon. Must be something about that green that gets them going. When I stop to reconsider the brachys here, the larvae I’ve found are usually not a green color. Tan, white or yellow are the colors I see usually. I’m not a trained entomologist so anything I see with that squared off case becomes a brachy. Undoubtedly there are other species that build that style of case. If we go back to the quick, simple, and effective (QSE) idea, I’d guess this pattern could be taken for both free living and cased species. I fish two or three streams with heavy concentrations of rhyacophila. You really can’t beat this pattern for QSE especially the E. Get those ties out of the box and into the water. LOL.

Jon Redwine
9 months ago

I’m going post one I squeezed out of a casing in my local waters. I feel like I’ve seen tan ones too, but the one I will post is the color most of them are. I couldn’t help but take a photo of it. The next post I put up will be my rendition of it. See what you think.

Leland Eaton
7 months ago

Great fly😀

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