Gary Hanke
6 months ago

Chironomid/Buzzer style angling in Europe and specifically in Great Britain, has evolved over the last 80 years into an angling and tying art form within the fly-fishing world, primarily for the loch style or Stillwater angling. After having studied at length, many of the European Chironomid larval patterns from numerous great fly tiers and anglers throughout the United Kingdom and Europe I then cross-compared them with the general North American patterns. I found myself disenchanted from a tying perspective and less excited about what we are trying to do, for presentation of the chironomid larva or bloodworm. Many of the patterns are very stout and at some point in the tying process begin to resemble the pupa stage rather than the larva stage of the chironomid life cycle. We seem to have a limited selection of threads and types of threads by comparison to most of the European fly shops. It almost seemed like a pothole where it has become the same dogma of tying styles, the same techniques or procedures repeated over and over with little change in the patterns, that seem to only be distinguishably different in colour.

The British call many patterns “Buzzers”. That is the stage within the life cycle that specifically represents the pupa stage as it transforms from larva to adult. Larval are seldom found far above the lake substrate and are usually in or on the substrate. This is a good reason to use this pattern as a point fly or anchor fly on a cast of two or more fly patterns. The pattern can be weighted by using a flat lead to maintain the profile, instead of a tungsten bead if required for lake or river presentations. The larva phase is a highly active stage that trout will react to with great vehemence when the larva either ascends to feed, or rise slowly to morph into the pupa. Often a stomach pump sample will reveal both larva and pupa. This would suggest feeding at multiple levels. As Chironomid style angling in Europe and specifically in Great Britain, has evolved over the last 80 years into an angling and tying art form within the fly-fishing world, primarily for the loch style or Stillwater angling. After having studied at length, many of the European Chironomid larval patterns from numerous great fly tiers and anglers throughout the United Kingdom and Europe I then cross-compared them with the general North American patterns. I found myself disenchanted from a tying perspective and less excited about what we are trying to do, for presentation of the chironomid larva or bloodworm. Many of the patterns are very stout and at some point in the tying process begin to resemble the pupa stage rather than the larva stage of the chironomid life cycle. We seem to have a limited selection of threads and types of threads by comparison to most of the European fly shops. It almost seemed like a pothole where it has become the same dogma of tying styles, the same techniques or procedures repeated over and over with little change in the patterns, that seem to only be distinguishably different in colour.

The British call many patterns “Buzzers”. That is the stage within the life cycle that specifically represents the pupa stage as it transforms from larva to adult. Larval are seldom found far above the lake substrate and are usually in or on the substrate. This is a good reason to use this pattern as a point fly or anchor fly on a cast of two or more fly patterns. The pattern can be weighted by using a flat lead to maintain the profile, instead of a tungsten bead if required for lake or river presentations. The larva phase is a highly active stage that trout will react to with great vehemence when the larva either ascends to feed, or rise slowly to morph into the pupa. Often a stomach pump sample will reveal both larva and pupa. This would suggest feeding at multiple levels. Chironomid style angling in Europe and specifically in Great Britain, has evolved over the last 80 years into an angling and tying art form within the fly-fishing world, primarily for the loch style or Stillwater angling. After having studied at length, many of the European Chironomid larval patterns from numerous great fly tiers and anglers throughout the United Kingdom and Europe I then cross-compared them with the general North American patterns. I found myself disenchanted from a tying perspective and less excited about what we are trying to do, for presentation of the chironomid larva or bloodworm. Many of the patterns are very stout and at some point in the tying process begin to resemble the pupa stage rather than the larva stage of the chironomid life cycle. We seem to have a limited selection of threads and types of threads by comparison to most of the European fly shops. It almost seemed like a pothole where it has become the same dogma of tying styles, the same techniques or procedures repeated over and over with little change in the patterns, that seem to only be distinguishably different in colour.

The British call many patterns “Buzzers”. That is the stage within the life cycle that specifically represents the pupa stage as it transforms from larva to adult. Larval are seldom found far above the lake substrate and are usually in or on the substrate. This is a good reason to use this pattern as a point fly or anchor fly on a cast of two or more fly patterns. The pattern can be weighted by using a flat lead to maintain the profile, instead of a tungsten bead if required for lake or river presentations. The larva phase is a highly active stage that trout will react to with great vehemence when the larva either ascends to feed, or rise slowly to morph into the pupa. Often a stomach pump sample will reveal both larva and pupa. This would suggest feeding at multiple levels. Chironomid style angling in Europe and specifically in Great Britain, has evolved over the last 80 years into an angling and tying art form within the fly-fishing world, primarily for the loch style or Stillwater angling. After having studied at length, many of the European Chironomid larval patterns from numerous great fly tiers and anglers throughout the United Kingdom and Europe I then cross-compared them with the general North American patterns. I found myself disenchanted from a tying perspective and less excited about what we are trying to do, for presentation of the chironomid larva or bloodworm. Many of the patterns are very stout and at some point in the tying process begin to resemble the pupa stage rather than the larva stage of the chironomid life cycle. We seem to have a limited selection of threads and types of threads by comparison to most of the European fly shops. It almost seemed like a pothole where it has become the same dogma of tying styles, the same techniques or procedures repeated over and over with little change in the patterns, that seem to only be distinguishably different in colour.

The British call many patterns “Buzzers”. That is the stage within the life cycle that specifically represents the pupa stage as it transforms from larva to adult. Larval are seldom found far above the lake substrate and are usually in or on the substrate. This is a good reason to use this pattern as a point fly or anchor fly on a cast of two or more fly patterns. The pattern can be weighted by using a flat lead to maintain the profile, instead of a tungsten bead if required for lake or river presentations. The larva phase is a highly active stage that trout will react to with great vehemence when the larva either ascends to feed, or rise slowly to morph into the pupa. Often a stomach pump sample will reveal both larva and pupa. This would suggest feeding at multiple levels. If you add a 4.0-3.3 mm bead at the head. Then this pattern makes an excellent worm for flowing waters. With the thin narrow profile and colour opportunities it is easily adapted to any flowing water. This pattern often in flowing water is our control fly to achieve depth. Without any significant drag this pattern sinks very quickly when the Tungsten Bead is applied.
#flytying #flyanatomy #flyaddict #sanjuan #chironocandy #flylifecanada #flylife #garyhanke #albertaflyfishing #albertaflyfish #larva #larvae #larve #nanosilk #buzzer #chironomid #chironomiae #chironomidae #waterworm #wormfly #worm #wormhook #worms

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