Kermit’s Revenge Strike Indicators
Tied by: Bill Trublubug Southeastern PA, US
Bill Trublubug

Bill Trublubug
2 months ago

A good strike indicator but also strike inducer for still water. It’s a smaller version of a frog pattern I’ve posted here before as Kermit’s Revenge.

Useful when fishing larger nymph patterns like dragon flies.

Pick a color, go crazy, have fun. LOL

Travis Fisher
2 months ago

Awsome pic

Bill Trublubug
2 months ago

Thanks Travis. These are fun to tie and take little time or materials. I sometimes get surprised at the size of the bass that will eat my “indicator”.

Cooper
2 months ago

Great tie! What’s the body material?

Bill Trublubug
2 months ago

HI @CooperE The body is a pre-shaped foam “spider” body. They come in quite a selection of sizes for use on hook sizes ranging from size 12 thru size 4. They come in black or white foam generally and I purchased these from Bob Marriott’s. To enhance their floatation, I superglue them to a sheet of 2 mm craft store foam and then cut away the excess craft foam to keep the body shape. This isn’t totally necessary but it has other purposes besides floatation (more on this in a moment). Instead of tying them down making a “waist”, as shown on Marriott’s site for a panfish spider, I tie them flat over the hook shank to get that frog shape. I mentioned “other purposes” above. Here they are: first, you can use white or cream color craft foam to mimic the light color of a frog’s belly. You can find this foam with glitter built in too. Depends on the look you like. Second, I like these to stand up to punishment. I carefully cut a slit the depth of the glued on craft foam using a sharp blade (x-acto knife). Wrap a thread body the length of the hook shank, tie in the spider body by the narrow tip at the rear of the hook. Coat the thread wraps along the shank lightly with superglue and force the body over the shank using the slot you cut into it. If you press down on top and together on the sides of the body, the glue makes the whole construction one piece with the hook. You get a three for one using the craft foam, color, durability, and enhanced flotation. Color the foam with permanent markers as desired. That’s the body part you asked about. The legs are fine silicon leg material, usually 10 strands or so. I “sew” the legs into the foam using a needle (with a large eye). Thread the legs into the eye of the needle, push the needle across the foam body pulling the legs through the foam. See photo for the correct angle to push the needle. You can create both front and rear legs with one push. Repeat on other side. Add 3 or 4 mm some type eyes to head. Let me know if this is clear enough.

Bill Trublubug
2 months ago

Duhhhhhhhhh Just realized several things forgotten above. First, Hook size for this one is a 6 3x long, custom bent to open hook gap a bit. Not absolutely necessary but it helps if you are adding the craft store foam to the bottom of the spider body. Second, when tying in the spider body at rear of hook, turn the body upside down so the slit/slot is facing up. Tie in at the narrow point of the body, then add glue to hook shank and fold the spider over hook shank so slit/slot engages the hook shank. Gives a neater appearance to the fly instead of a bunch of thread wraps showing at hook bend.

Eric löhr
2 months ago

A very fine fly pattern

Cooper
2 months ago

Thanks Bill!

Please sign in or sign up to comment on this fly...

Uploaded 2 months ago
Views 74
Likes 27
Comments 7
Flyboxes 2